my boy

I have knit 6 sweaters for Jerry over the years.

Boy SweaterBoy Sweater, August 2006

Saddle Shouldered SweaterPirate Sweater, January 2007

WallasaurusWallasaurus, February-March 2007

Wonderful Wallaby VestWallaby Meets Vest, June 2007

skull cable vestSkull Cable Vest (he never wore it), November 2007

And, the sixth:

shirt yoke sweaterStriped Kid Sweater, July 2009

I’m feeling a fair amount of nostalgia looking back over these pictures. Jerry has grown up so much and it has happened in the blink of an eye. The sweaters are getting bigger and they take longer to knit, and I really can’t believe I have a 7 year old boy getting ready for second grade.

The pattern: Seamless Shirt-Yoke Sweater by Elizabeth Zimmermann from Knitting Without Tears. Ravelry lists this pattern as being from Knitting Workshop, but I used KWT, where it briefly appears.

The yarn: Brown Sheep Nature Spun Sport. I have the urge to go buy tons and tons of this yarn. Knitting with it makes me want to only knit with it forever and ever (brief dalliances with yarns like Noro or Ultra Alpaca are expected, naturally). Unfortunately, due to low demand, my LYS has stopped stocking this yarn. I’m going to open a yarn store that stocks ONLY sport weight, woolen spun wool in a dizzying range of colors.

The gauge: 6 sts per inch. On a US 4 needle. The fabric is light – surprisingly light – for such a big sweater.

The pricetag: The whole sweater weighs 238 grams; less than 5 balls of yarn. At $3.50 per ball, you do the math. The cost of making this sweater is damn cheap, and the result is much nicer than anything you’d find in a store (the knitter says, humbly).

More pictures?

shirt yoke sweater

shirt yoke sweater

shirt yoke sweater

everything in its right place

I love this new sweater.

decreases

I’m calling it done even though it’s not quite. I have one underarm to graft and a few ends to weave in and then blocking. I made it lickety-split. I swatched then cast on on Sunday afternoon.

Kid sweaters usually come together lickety-split; that’s probably why I knit so many of them.

raglan

This sweater doesn’t belong to me. I made it for a class I’m teaching at my LYS (“Custom-sized Pullover for your Kid” is the name of the class). The striped raglan will live at Gate City Yarns for a while, but maybe if I make them another sample, they’ll give this one back to me after a while.

The yarn is O-Wool Balance (organic, how fancy) and it was really, really nice to work with. I am in spazzy love with it. The blend is 50 Merino/ 50 Cotton and it has all this lovely tweediness that I think gives the sweater such charachter.

Can you guess the pattern? Of course, it’s EZ, but I used a Spun-Out design called A Family of Raglans (SO45/WG69 on Rav). I have Zimmermann raglan patterns in the books, but this – a single page leaflet available for $1 from Schoolhouse Press – is a pattern chock full of new-to-me information. Worth $1? Damn straight.

short rows
baby got back

There are short rows hidden in there to make the back longer than the front. I’m terrible at knitting short rows, and if I showed you a better picture you might see how unsightly they are on the yoke. This bothers me only slightly, thank goodness, because what’s really important here is that it’s a highly serviceable sweater.

my Mag

Cute, no?

Some basic notes on the design:

  • I used a smaller needle on 100% of the stitches for the edges. It really doesn’t get any easier than that.
  • The decreases at the raglan lines were suggested in the pattern: Dec rnd: K2tog, p1, ssk. Plain rnd: knit. I’d never used it before and I like it a lot.
  • Um, that’s it. It was a really easy sweater.

Now all that’s left is that other underarm, and blocking! And then I say goodbye to this sweet striped raglan for a long, long time…