talkeetna two

I’m working on knitting a pattern that I designed over a year ago. It’s Talkeetna, which originally appeared in the Winter 2009 Petite Purls. So I cast on with the needle and yarn that was listed in the pattern, knit the hat, and realized it was way too big. I guess after a year maybe my knitting style has changed and I should have checked my gauge with a swatch.

Luckily, I have someone who benefits from my mistakes.

My sister, Holly! Every time she visits I give her something handknit. I don’t plan it, but she always leaves with something! Last time she got the Northman Mittens. She is a knitter herself, and she lives in Alaska where it is cold, so she deserves these things.

Holly!

I asked her to try the hat on and when I realized it fit her perfectly, I said, “Oh good! I just have to make a quick pompom and it’ll be finished!” And you know what? She didn’t want the pompom. Blasphemy!

Not everyone loves a pompom, and I’m coming to terms with that. I don’t understand it, but at least I can try to accept it.

Pattern: Talkeetna, free on Petite Purls, or download the free PDF here.
Yarn: Lanaloft Sports Weight
To knit the adult size, work at a gauge of 6 sts per inch, instead of the gauge shown in the pattern.

Undergrowth Hat

Free Pattern in Knitty

Last night, after spending the day attempting to clean up my room and fill up my new filing cabinet (not a hard task, but a big one I’ll tell you), I sat down to the computer to find a tweet and forum post alerting me to some awesome news.

Knitty is live!

In the new issue is my Undergrowth pattern, a color stranded hat with a double! braid! The hat is worked in Nature Spun Sport, and you achieve different sizes (18.5, 20, 21.5″) by adjusting your needles. Best of all, because this is Knitty, it’s free! I hope you enjoy it.

I’m headed out to Durham for my book signing soon, so I won’t be updating my pattern shop until later today. In the mean time, you can find more details about Undergrowth on Ravelry or head over to Knitty to print out the pattern.

In this issue of Knitty, you’ll also find a pretty rockin’ review of The Red Collection by the editorial staff. So cool! Here’s a snapshot of the review, if you’re interested.

I must thank my gorgeous model, Mallory. She really knows how to show off the handknits.

And my favorite part of the hat, the top:

Isn’t she just gorgeous?

Maggie’s Kitchen

If you know me in real life, then you probably know how good I’ve got it. My husband, Gerald, cooks dinner. I stay at home every day while he’s off at work, then he comes home and whips up something delicious. He used to be a chef, so to him cooking dinner is no big deal. I’m a lucky girl, for sure.

Although I spend a great deal of time in the kitchen, it is most certainly Gerald’s kitchen. I’m a good baker, a master cleaner-upper, and recently I have been preparing more dinners than in years past, but still, I’m just a guest there. We do things his way.

For example, if it were my kitchen, we would have a little drawer with oven mitts and potholders for pulling hot things out of the oven. But having been a chef in many kitchens, he has no time for silly things like potholders. Gerald uses a kitchen towel for everything from wiping the counter off to grabbing hot pans. I’ve had to adjust.

And Gerald has a tendency to be, um, a little messy. If I had sweet little handmade potholders lying around the kitchen, they’d quickly get icky and dirty. I can’t have that.

That’s a long way of saying all these potholders I’ve been crocheting lately are completely useless in my our kitchen. If I don’t give them away as gifts, they will probably end up as playthings in…Maggie’s Kitchen.

maggie's kitchen potholder free pattern

FREE CROCHET PATTERN! Maggie’s Kitchen

Free Pattern

Use it to make crocheted hot pads, potholders, coasters, or toys for your 4 year old’s play kitchen. The pattern includes instructions for a basic circle out of double crochet, and a choice of five different edgings. There is also info on how to attach a little plastic ring for hanging.

If you are a seasoned crocheter, then you can probably look at the picture to figure out the pattern. This project is ideal for knitters who want to expand their crochet skillz. But be forewarned – crocheted potholder are highly addictive.

Maggie's Kitchen

I used Cotton Classic from Tahki Stacy Charles, Inc. and a size D (3.25 mm) hook. The finished size in the pattern is 4.25″ (11 cm) circumference before the edging. It is very easy to make bigger potholders by adding additional rounds.

The free pattern Crocheted Potholders by Bea Aarebrot inspired this design. I updated the terminology to US crochet terms and expanded the edging choices. Big thanks to Bea for allowing me to share this with all of you!

Find it on Ravelry here. See a few more pictures in my Maggie’s Kitchen Flickr set. Download the pattern immediately by clicking the link below (you do not need to be a Ravelry member to download). Thanks, and enjoy!

Free Pattern