Ziggity

Ziggity Hat and Mittens

Here we go with the next set of patterns from the book, Ziggity. The Ziggity Hat at is super-slouchy. I have a distinct memory of knitting the hat and thinking, “Man, this is taking a while.” It did take a while, because the hat is huge. But huge in that look-how-cool-i-look-in-my-huge-slouchy-hat kind of way.

Ziggity Hat and Mittens

The hat begins with 1×1 Ribbing, then has a jaunty little picot trim. I love that picot! If you buy the Print Edition of the book, there are detailed instructions for knitting the picot.

Then come the wide zigzags. Four pattern rows of colorwork and four single colored rows  – the knitting of this one is easy. It would be a good first colorwork project if you haven’t knit with two colors in the same row of knitting before.

The big slouchy hat (in the pattern I refer to it as “floppy”) is good, but some people prefer something a little less floppy. So I also include instructions for a non-floppy version of the Ziggity hat:

Ziggity Hat and Mittens

The mittens have the same 1×1 Ribbing and picot edge, which takes these from plain ziggity mittens to Ziggity Mittens with Picot! Can’t get enough of the picot, I’m telling you.

Ziggity Hat and Mittens

The Ziggity set is knit out of Ultra Alpaca from Berroco. A great yarn for this project, but also an easy yarn to substitute…you probably have some worsted weight yarn in your stash already!

Ziggity Hat and Mittens

So what are you waiting for? Fall is coming, with winter right on it’s heels! You’ll need mittens and hats, I’m sure!

Learn more about the Ziggity Hat & Mittens:
Ziggity pattern details on my blog.
Ziggity pattern page on Ravelry.


About The Red Collection

The Red Collection has 12 patterns for hats and matching mittens (or mitts, or wristers). This is a self-published book and I’ve been working on these patterns, photographs, book design, and marketing for the last year!

The Print Edition of the book can be pre-ordered now, and will ship in October.

Please note: The Print Edition includes special sections on yarn, gauge, and finishing, and also has a special techniques section to help you knit the projects from the book. These sections are not included in digital versions of the patterns.

Ways to Get The Red Collection

For the best price per pattern, please consider purchasing the complete collection of patterns. The digital versions of the patterns are available for instant download (click the links below for more details).

The Red Collection: Print Edition – $20 + shipping
The Red Collection: Print Edition + Complete Digital Pattern Pack – $23 + shipping
The Red Collection: Complete Digital Pattern Pack – $20
Single Pattern or 2-Pattern Pack – from $6

Just want Ziggity? Use these links:

ziggity pack ziggity hat ziggity mittens
Pattern Pack: $9 Ziggity Hat: $6 Ziggity Mittens: $6

The last Red Collection pattern pack — Radio Frequency — is coming up next!

diamond

I should have taken more pictures of this vest in progress, but I was too busy knitting it! I have finished weaving in all the ends but there’s still one small detail left to do before I call this finished. It’s something I’ve been meaning to put on a Maggie sweater for some time. Any guesses?

vest for Maggie

vest for Maggie

vest for Maggie

It will get a pocket! As an afterthought (though I planned it ahead of time).

The yarn is Chickadee from the new yarn company Quince & Co. It is so soft, the colors are to die for, and I loved working with it. The yarn is, as far as I can tell, a worsted spun yarn, meaning the fibers are all aligned nicely and it has a very boing-y quality to it. It is very stretchy and delicious and plump.

The trouble with a worsted spun yarn is that it doesn’t have a tendency to stick to itself like a woolen spun (Shetland style) yarn does.  I used steeks, all the while knowing that the yarn isn’t as felty as I like it to be when using steeks.  I reinforced my steek using the crochet method and I’m not too worried about it, but the yarn is not ideal for steeking.

Still, I love this little vest to pieces. I think I’ll make one for Jerry* and write up the pattern.

*Jerry assured me that, while he doesn’t necessarily want a vest, he will “wear it for pictures”. Good boy.

requested sweater

Jerry asked for a sweater.  Even though he is the warmest boy in world, braving the coldest days in a t-shirt and shorts if I would let him, I am knitting him a sweater.  Without really thinking the whole thing through, I’m knitting it out of worsted weight Cascade 220, which makes for a Very Warm Sweater.

requested sweater - front

After I snapped this picture, I crocheted the steeks, cut the tiny neck steek in order for the whole thing to lay flat, and blocked it.  Yesterday was rainy, today is rainy/icy/snowy/all around wet, and so I will have to wait (and wait and wait) for it to dry before I get back to it.  Sad.

I do not have high hopes that it will be worn very much.  In that sense, this is  a process sweater; the fun comes in designing and executing.  And what fun it is!

I’m making it big so it may have a chance next winter.  I’m making it will skulls, which increases it’s wearability potential.  I am even duplicate stitching green skull eyes (at the boy’s request), to up the ante even more.

The design is my own. I started with a swatch.

progress

The first design looked good on paper (the large silly bottom skulls) and looked horrible once knitted.  Then I took a break from it for a few weeks and came back with the new, argyle-insprired skulls at the top.  I like it a lot.

I have a feeling Jerry will like it, too. He has a thing for skulls:

DSC08490

Even if he wears it only once, how could I NOT knit this cutie pie a sweater?